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Inside, Out: How to Prepare Your Indoor Plants to Move Outdoors for the Summer

Inside, Out: How to Prepare Your Indoor Plants to Move Outdoors for the Summer

It’s vacay time—for your indoor plants, that is. Move your indoor plants out in the summer to make them happy and healthy. Plus, it will jazz up your patio! Follow these tips on how to prepare your indoor plants to move outdoors.

First things first, we only recommend moving your indoor plants outside if you have extra attention and time to keep an eye on them since transitioning your indoor plants to the outdoors requires extra commitment to make sure they survive the transition.

You are not the only one who loves the sunny days of summer, your indoor plants too! There is nothing wrong with giving your indoor plants some extra humidity, fresh air, and sun after they have spent months cooped up indoors. In fact, moving your indoor plants outside can be good for them. Trust us, they will appreciate and love you for it! However, it’s not as simple as moving them outside when you think it’s warm enough.

There are factors you need to consider before you rush to bring your indoor plants to the great outdoors, such as they need to be gradually acclimated to the outdoor environment to lessen the amount of shock and stress. However, it’s only one of the tips on how to prepare your indoor plants to move outdoors. There are other factors you need to turn your attention to, such as the last frost date, sun & heat, and rain. Plus, have you asked yourself if you have extra attention and time to keep an eye on them? Can your indoor plants survive the great outdoors?

RELATED: Beat the Heat: 5 Houseplants to Help Keep Your House Cool

Below are the factors you need to learn on how to prepare your indoor plants to move outdoors.

CREDIT: JUSTINA BLAKENEY

When to Move Your Indoor Plants Outside?

One of the tips on how to prepare your indoor plants to move outdoors is to wait until after the last frost date. We know that it’s tempting to bring your indoor plants outside before the last frost date, but don’t do it! Most indoor plants are tropical species so cold temperatures might just damage your indoor plants. Wait until nightly temperatures are consistently above about 65°F. If the temperature is below 65°F, don’t bring your indoor plants outside.

Question: Can all indoor plants go outside? The answer is yes. Almost all indoor plants can go outside, as long as you keep in mind the intensity of the outdoor sunlight.

RELATED: 10 Best Outdoor Plants for a Lush Patio Space

CREDIT: VENICE ROOTS LA

Sun & Heat

One of the biggest challenges when moving your indoor plants outside is the sun and heat. Bricks and concrete absorb and radiate heat, which can burn your plants. It also quickly dries out their potting mix, so you will most likely be watering your plants every single day. That’s why we only recommend moving your indoor plants outside if you have extra attention and time to keep an eye on them since the sun and heat will dry your plants out in no time. Additionally, never place your indoor plants in direct sunlight outdoors because it will be difficult and stressful for them to adjust.

Start by placing your indoor plants in a nicely shaded area. Give them time to take in the fresh air for a few hours every day. Then gradually move them to an area with a little sunshine. Slowly increase their time outdoors, as well. Do this process for a couple of weeks until your plants are well adapted to their outdoor environment.

Repotting + Water & Rain

Repotting and watering your plants go hand in hand. If your plant is in a pot without drainage, repot it first in a pot with proper drainage before you bring it outside. We are well aware that a pot without drainage can lead to root rot. If your plant is in a pot with proper drainage, you can skip watering whenever it rains. Additionally, consider the pot’s material since plants in unglazed pots, such as terra cotta may require watering every day.

RELATED: OMYSA Large Fiberstone Round Planter

Wind

Yes, the wind is one of the other biggest challenges, particularly on balconies and rooftops, where wind can knock your plants down. Additionally, the cold wind can damage your plants. Check how windy your outdoor space gets before moving your indoor plants outside. It’s one of the factors you need to consider on how to prepare your indoor plants to move outdoors.

CREDIT: JUSTINA BLAKENEY

Pests

It’s impossible not to encounter insects and pests. Moving your indoor plants outside means plant hitchhikers residing in your plants, especially underneath the leaves. To help limit the chance for insects and other pests, use risers underneath your plants. Before you bring your plants back indoors, inspect them first, spray them with insecticidal soap, and trim leaves that need to be trimmed. Make sure you get rid of any pests they might have picked up at your balcony, deck, or yard.

RELATED: 7 Most Common Houseplant Pests and How to Get Rid of Them

Plant Food

Lastly, one of the factors you need to consider on how to prepare your indoor plants to move outdoors is their food. Feeding your plants is important to their growth. Experts recommend using the type of plant food that works for your plants, like a granular slow-release fertilizer, a water-soluble fertilizer, or soil spikes. Always follow the instructions on fertilizer labels since too much can kill your plant. We know that you mean well, but too much fertilizer is unhealthy for your plant.

RELATED: Beginner’s Guide on How to Fertilize Your Plants

Let your indoor plants play outdoors in summer. They will grow faster, become fuller in shape, and have more vibrant leaves! Plus, moving your indoor plants outside frees up space at your home. Make sure to use this opportunity to give your space a clean sweep.

Check out our Plant Care blog to learn more about different houseplants and tips on how to keep your plants alive and healthy.

Whatever houseplant you choose to transform your home into a lively oasis, you’ll definitely need a stylish planter to display your plant baby in. No matter what your style, there’s an Omysa planter that will be perfect with your garden and home’s décor. From ceramics to fiberstone, check out Omysa’s Shop and add it to your cart!

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